Fort Clinch – Part 3 – The history and building

Here is an aerial view of the fort.  It is located on the mouth of the St. Mary’s River and was built to defend the deepwater port of Fernandina, FL.   Construction of the fort began in 1847 and is named after General Duncan Lamont Clinch.

The fort served as a military post during the Civil War, Spanish-American War, and World War II.  It is known as a Third System Fortification.

  1. Earthworks, 1794-1807:  simple open earth works.
  2. Masonry Fort, 1807-1812:  Masonry-faced earth fort, with bomb-proof gun emplacements.
  3. The Ultimate Fort, 1812-1868:  two wall system, brick and earth.

The walls are made of a cement type material using shells and rocks from the area.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

 The walls are then lined with brick.  In the picture below you can see the cement  lined with the brick.  Look at that view!  Who wouldn’t want to be stationed here?   See the Tilly hat floating at the lower right corner?  That’s the husband.  We are going down the steps to the tunnel to get to the Bastion.  There are six at this fort and you can see them in the aerial view.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

The rooms under the Bastion were bricked.  They had some beds in there, but I am not so sure they were actually barracks.  They had another place for enlisted men, maybe these beds were for soldiers on duty.  Anyhoo, just wanted to show you the ceiling.  Very interesting architecture.  I think it is a pretty place.  😀

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket        Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket 

The bricks had to be sliced thin to make the arch at the top of the ceiling.

Now for today’s mystery question.   What is this below?  You can see the cannons on the upper level.  You can also see this area on the aerial picture.

 Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

UPDATE 10/29/07:  Since Sheri is the only one who guessed on this, she gets the credit.  Actually, she is correct.  Those are fireplaces you see there.  These are unfinished baracks.   If you look to the left, you’ll see a pile of building material.  All these building materials were left there at the time the construction of the fort was haulted.  That was in 1867!  You can see more in the aerial view. 🙂    

 The answer to the question in my last post

 The hole mentioned in the last post was used to hoist the cannon balls to the second level.   They needed quick access to the ammunition.  Here you can see some of the items in the storage  room located below the cannons.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

In the ceiling you can see the small hole. 

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

The soldiers used this leather device to pull the cannon balls up through the hole.  The knots on the rope were used to help pull it up.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Looks like Sheri guessed right.  😀

Advertisements

4 responses to “Fort Clinch – Part 3 – The history and building

  1. That was Alex’s guess….he’ll be happy to know.

    My next guess is that is a firing range, although they look like big fireplaces to me.

    I like your apple family in the header photo. 😀

  2. < ![CDATA[That was Alex's guess....he'll be happy to know. My next guess is that is a firing range, although they look like big fireplaces to me. I like your apple family in the header photo. :D]]>

  3. Very interesting!!

    Glad that you learned so much. CW stuff is very interesting and I’d love for us to take a trip to see some of it as hubby would be in heaven – well except for when they tell him he can’t play w/the cannons and rifles!!

  4. < ![CDATA[Very interesting!! Glad that you learned so much. CW stuff is very interesting and I'd love for us to take a trip to see some of it as hubby would be in heaven - well except for when they tell him he can't play w/the cannons and rifles!!]]>

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s