2008/2009 Portfolios

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My two youngest girls do not take a group test, like my older kids do.  I take The Peas (two youngest girls) to a licensed teacher to be evaluated.  The evaluator needs to see samples of the girls progress throughout the year. 

Each year I prepare portfolios.  Each year I wait until the last minute and pull a couple of all nighters preparing these portfolios.   Well, not this year.  This year, since Christmas, I have taken one or two evenings a month putting things in order.  Starting week, I’ll be spending two evenings a week on them.  What am I doing?  Getting photos in there, making sure pages are in order, putting notebooks together that I was too lazy to put together when we actually did them.  You know, things like that.

Here is what I usually place in the portfolios.  It is simple and plain, except for the photos I add in there. One year my kids were out sick for almost a month because of Chicken Pox.  Yep, I took pictures of them, to prove it.  😀 

Last year, our portfolios had several books that would not fit into the large notebooks.  This year, it will be more of the same.  🙂   I am looking forward to these evaluations.  I am so ready for this school year to end.

If you have to keep records for your children, do you make a portfolio?  What do you put in them?

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5 responses to “2008/2009 Portfolios

  1. We are very lucky to be in Minnesota where the homeschooling requirements are very minimal. You have to notify the superintendent of your intent to homeschool by Oct. 1st. and you have to have yearly testing done, although we don’t need to submit the scores. That’s it. No portfolios. No curriculum approval. No report cards turned in (unless you do not have a college education in any field…then you need to turn in quarterly report cards). However, I do use Homeschool Tracker Plus and record our attendance, field trips, lessons completed, volunteer work, etc. I do print off all my records and put them in a binder at the end of the year just to document what we have done. But I do that for me and the boys…not for the state.

  2. doucementgently

    Our state does not require testing or portfolios, but I do keep records and samples of their work. In my “master” binder, I keep tests (spelling, math, “semester” or “end of year” tests in science/history/religion) in my master records book (by year). I also have a 3-ring binder of some of their other work (maps, drawings, write-ups, etc.). Each child has a notebook (0r three) for different subjects where they write all their non-loose stuff (compositions, handwriting, etc). It ends up taking up about 6″ of shelf space each year. That will grow as more of the children get to be of school age.

    It is really interesting to compare year-by-year to see the progress made by a child. I definitely can’t compare child-to-child as their talents are so wildly different. (For example, my oldest is pencil-phobic. My #2 loves to write & draw. Her cursive is better than #1’s.)

  3. We have to keep portfolios, but we don’t have to show them to anyone. In the past, that meant that if anyone had asked me, “Is this a portfolio?” my response would have been, “That depends on what the definition of ‘is’ is.” 😉 But now our portfolios look pretty good. I actually wrote a blog post about it last summer.

    http://foursquares.squarespace.com/home/2008/7/7/homeschool-portfolios.html

  4. Gosh your girls have really grown and grown up in the past year since I found your blog and asked you for help.

    When I homeschooled. We just had to keep a record of days spend in school. and Can’t remember what else. too long ago. It was pretty much a disaster of a year….sweet son was 12 yo /6th grade and thats all we did at home. But he did graduate from college in 4 years.

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